Muslim columnist in Glamour magazine: “When you wear a turtleneck, you’re elegant; when I wear one I’m oppressed”

The article below by Hoda Katebi in Glamour magazine asserts:

Non-Muslim women can sport modest clothing and be called professional or elegant, yet when Muslim women dress modestly, our taste and style is often overlooked. Or, to put it more bluntly, when you wear a turtleneck, you’re elegant; when I wear one I’m oppressed.

There is actually no double standard about modest dressing in the West. It is a pity to point out what should be obvious in the face of deceit from Hoda Katebi (promoted by Glamour magazine), but here we go again:

Western women are not told how to dress by religious law, as are Muslim women. Western women are not warned that if they choose not to fully cover up, then they deserve to be abused:
(Quran 24:31) And tell the believing women to reduce of their vision and guard their private parts and not expose their adornment except that which appears thereof and to wrap [a portion of] their head covers over their chests and not expose their adornment except to their husbands, their fathers, their husbands’ fathers, their sons, their husbands’ sons, their brothers, their brothers’ sons, their sisters’ sons, their women, that which their right hands possess, or those male attendants having no physical desire, or children who are not yet aware of the private aspects of women. And let them not stamp their feet to make known what they conceal of their adornment. And turn to Allah in repentance, all of you, O believers, that you might succeed.

If a woman does not cover, she is fair game to be assaulted:

(Quran 33:59) O Prophet, tell your wives and your daughters and the women of the believers to bring down over themselves of their outer garments. That is more suitable that they will be known and not be abused.

When Western women wear a turtleneck or full body coverings, it is usually in colder weather. Katebi herself describes the turtleneck fashion releases for runways in fall and the Macy’s line in February. Otherwise, the turtleneck is worn with a no-sleeve blouse in the dog days of summer. One hardly ever sees Western women wearing turtlenecks with ankle-length skirts and head coverings in the scorching heat of summer for the sake of modesty. In the West, it is fair to say that to cover up in that way, especially if there is a threat if one does not do so, amounts to oppression. That’s no double standard.
Western women are not forcibly suffocated under full niqab, as are many Muslim women — even some who insist also that such coverings are “modest” and their choice.
Women in the West have choice. Women who abide by the sharia do not.
Hoda Katebi states:

As a Muslim American political fashion blogger who’s dressed modestly for most of her adult life (for me, that means favoring billowy cuts and not showing skin beyond my face and forearms)…

The biggest problem many Western women have is their gullibility. The biggest double standard that exists in the West is that of radical feminists who claim to support equal rights for women, but have abandoned FGM victims, child brides, and Muslim women who are authorized under religious law to be beaten, and/or who are forced to cover up.

Katebi can openly spread her deception in Western society because of what is left of the freedom of speech, threatened as it is by Sharia expansionists. Those supremacists take full advantage of the freedom of speech in levying false charges of “Islamophobia” and double-standards as they ignore the mistreatment of women all across the Islamic world and increasingly in the West.

Some more of Katebi’s thoughts:

This country was literally built on the backs of Black slaves and after the genocide of indigenous people….my work is centered on challenging the privilege of white people in this country and challenging the racist institutions on which this country was built.

It is a shame that long after the abolition of slavery, the end of segregation, much repentance, and a black President in the U.S., blacks are still being held as slaves by Muslims in Sudan and Mauritania, and the black Muslims of Boko Haram (along with their jihadist Fulani associates) are massacring the black Christians of Nigeria. The same goes for al Shabab in Somalia and Kenya.

“When You Wear a Turtleneck, You’re Elegant; When I Wear One, I’m Oppressed,” by Hoda Katebi, Glamour, May 10, 2018:

If you follow runway news even casually, you’ve likely heard about the rise of “modest” dressing. Broadly defined as clothing that’s not revealing in terms of cut and fit, modest dressing isn’t exactly a new idea, but in the last few seasons, it’s emerged as a consistent theme in the mainstream, secular fashion scene. On the fall 2018 runways, for example, there were below-the-knee skirts paired with up-to-the-collarbone blouses at Tibi, all manner of oversize outerwear at Balenciaga, anoraks as dresses at Dries van Noten, and long skirts over trousers at Gucci.

Meanwhile, brands have started catering more explicitly to “modest” dressers, including sites like the Modist, which sells designer pieces that fit within modesty standards from the likes of Marni and Rachel Comey, as well as Macy’s, which in February introduced The Verona Collection, a line of modest clothing. Just this week H&M announced it would also launch a modest fashion line. In fact, if you keep up with fashion trends, there’s a good chance the clothes you’re wearing are more covered up than the ones you were wearing, say, two years ago.

As a Muslim American political fashion blogger who’s dressed modestly for most of her adult life (for me, that means favoring billowy cuts and not showing skin beyond my face and forearms), you’d think I’d be all for this.

And, to a certain extent, I am: I have no complaints about my newfound ability to walk into a store and pick out a long-sleeve shirt that isn’t translucent or dramatically scoop-neck with relative ease. (Provided the shirt in question is ethically produced.) But there’s one huge difference between my wearing a chunky turtleneck with an ankle-grazing skirt and that same look on Valentino’s fall runway: I also pair my outfit with a hijab. As I’ve been seeing more people who dress the way I do from the neck down, I’ve become acutely aware of a painful double standard generated by what I choose to wear from the neck up: Non-Muslim women can sport modest clothing and be called professional or elegant, yet when Muslim women dress modestly, our taste and style is often overlooked. Or, to put it more bluntly, when you wear a turtleneck, you’re elegant; when I wear one I’m oppressed……
Source: https://www.jihadwatch.org/2018/05/muslim-columnist-in-glamour-magazine-when-you-wear-a-turtleneck-youre-elegant-when-i-wear-one-im-oppressed

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