Brett Kavanaugh, the embattled Supreme Court nominee who’s been accused by multiple women of sexual misconduct, will not return to teach at Harvard Law School this coming January, the university’s newspaper reported Monday.

“Today, Judge Kavanaugh indicated that he can no longer commit to teaching his course in January Term 2019,” Associate Dean Catherine Claypoole wrote in an email obtained by The Harvard Crimson. “So the course will not be offered.”

According to Harvard’s course catalog, the class was called “The Supreme Court Since 2005.” It detailed opinions the nation’s highest court has issued in recent years, particularly covering “war powers, campaign finance, religion, the health care law, equal protection/race, Second Amendment, Fourth Amendment, environmental law, marriage, federalism, separation of powers, and the death penalty.”

HE HAD TAUGHT AT HARVARD LAW SINCE 2008, ACCORDING TO HARVARD LAW TODAY.

Harvard Law students previously urged the school to bar Kavanaugh from teaching until “a full and fair investigation” was made in regards to the accusations made against him.

President Trump nominated Kavanaugh in July to fill retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy’s seat on the bench. Since then, three women have accused the circuit court judge of sexual assault or sexual misconduct that allegedly took place in the 1980s.

Kavanaugh has denied the allegations made against him, and testifed before the Senate Judiciary Committee last week on Capitol Hill. Following the hearing, the FBI opened an investigation into the allegations, and on Monday, the White House gave the agency clearance to interview anyone it wants by Friday.