Indonesia: Dozens of mosques attended by government workers are preaching jihad and attacks on non-Muslims

Dozens of Indonesian mosques that cater to government workers are spreading radicalism and calling for violence against non-Muslims…. Some clerics also called on the faithful to commit violence on behalf of IS — which claimed the May bombing attacks in Surabaya – and spread hatred or vilify Indonesia’s minority religions, which include Christianity, Buddhism and Hinduism.

The Islamic supremacist/jihadist imperative to attack and murder or subjugate infidels is a worldwide problem that has lasted 1,400 years. In countries such as Indonesia — the largest Muslim country in the world — innocent minorities are forced to live in an atmosphere of hatred, intolerance and persecution. No amount of appeasement will mitigate this. Yet irresponsible Western leaders continue to invite this theological norm into Western nations through open-door immigration, hoping that somehow, magically, Islamic supremacists will embrace infidels as equals and assimilate once they arrive in democratic societies.

“Dozens of Indonesian mosques attended by government workers are preaching jihad and calling for attacks on non-Muslims, the country’s intelligence agency reveals,” AFP, November 19, 2018:

Dozens of Indonesian mosques that cater to government workers are spreading radicalism and calling for violence against non-Muslims, the country’s intelligence agency said Monday.

Its findings come six months after Indonesia’s second-biggest city Surabaya was rocked by a wave of suicide bombings at several churches during Sunday services, killing a dozen people.

They were the deadliest terror attacks in about a decade and once again put religious tolerance in the world’s biggest Muslim majority in the spotlight.

The Indonesian State Intelligence Agency said Monday it has probed about one thousand mosques across the Southeast Asian archipelago since July and found that imams at some 41 places of worship in one Jakarta neighbourhood alone were preaching extremism to worshippers – mostly civil servants who work at nearby government ministries.

The Agency found about 17 clerics expressed support or sympathy for Islamic State and encouraged parishioners to fight for the jihadist group in Syria and Marawi, the Philippine city overrun by foreign IS fighters last year.

Some clerics also called on the faithful to commit violence on behalf of IS — which claimed the May bombing attacks in Surabaya – and spread hatred or vilify Indonesia’s minority religions, which include Christianity, Buddhism and Hinduism….

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