Pakistan: No sympathy in her home village for accused blasphemer Asia Bibi, “They should execute her”

Consider this paragraph:

“I would die in the name of my religion and if someone has committed blasphemy, then they are not forgiven,” said Shawkat Ali, a 62-year-old farmer. If the supreme court has some faith in religion and if they are Muslims, they should execute her.”

Those words are from a former neighbor of Asia Bibi in the village where she once lived. They represent the Islamic zeal that is rampant in Pakistan and many other Muslim countries.

Christians in Pakistan continue to endure regular attacks and threats, and have been living in fear particularly since Asia Bibi was acquitted. This past Christmas, there was tight security at Pakistan’s churches to guard against reprisal attacks over Bibi. Muslims still seek to kill her over the invented charges of blasphemy that had her in prison on death row for eight years, and as they cannot find her, other Christians are facing their wrath.

When Pakistan first elected Prime Minister Imran Khan in August, he came out forcefully in defense of Pakistan’s infamous blasphemy laws. Khan vowed to take the matter of blasphemy to the United Nations, saying that few in the West understood the pain caused to Muslims by such speech. Meanwhile, the West is increasingly succumbing to Islamic blasphemy laws. Twitter has even begun sending messages out to numerous counter-jihadists, informing them that they are in violation of Pakistan’s blasphemy laws.

Most alarming is that the UK has refused to offer asylum to Asia Bibi for fear of “unrest” from Muslims. It has also become “Islamophobic” and even a criminal offence to criticize Islam in the once-free West. For example: the European Court of Human Rights ruled that Western free speech ended with the “right of others to have their religious feelings protected” in the case of Elisabeth Sabaditsch-Wolff, who supposedly offended Islam by noting correctly that Islamic sources say Muhammad married a prepubescent child. Canada’s anti-Islamophobia motion M-103 aims to “monitor citizens for compliance” and “take action” against those deemed to be “Islamophobic.”

Asia Bibi’s former neighbor asked the question “how can we forgive her” for something Asia Bibi never did; that very question is now being asked in Western societies of those who tell the truth about the global jihad.

“‘She confessed… how can we forgive her?’: Little sympathy in Pakistan for Christian woman accused of blasphemy,” Telegraph, December 28, 2018:

ISLAMABAD — A decade ago it was an argument among such female workers that suddenly flared into an accusation of blasphemy and set in train bloody events that are still unresolved.

The accusation against a Christian mother of five called Asia Bibi and the death sentence that followed divided Pakistan and prompted religious extremists to assassinate two senior politicians who spoke out for her.

In October, the 54-year-old was acquitted on appeal but remains in protective custody until the ruling has been reviewed. She is widely expected to be freed to flee to the West where she will claim asylum.

Pakistan’s supreme court demolished Bibi’s conviction saying it was fatally undermined by procedural problems, contradictory testimony from her accusers and an apparently forced confession.

But even settling her abroad is not without complications. Wary of a reaction from Britain’s Muslim community, Theresa May, the prime minister, reportedly shrugged off the pleas of cabinet ministers that the U.K. step forward and offer a route to safety. Canada, Australia, or the U.S. are likely alternatives.

Yet in Ittan Wali, where it all began, time has not mellowed the villagers’ accusations and there is no forgiveness for a woman who spent eight years on death row.
“She confessed her crime in front of them, how can they forgive her?” asked Mohammad Bota, the 50-year-old elder brother of Mohammad Idris. Villagers in Ittan Wali were open, hospitable and insisted their village was not backward. But they were also uncompromising when it came to the former neighbour who had lived in a small house with a blue painted gate.

All maintained that Asia Bibi had confessed to insulting the Prophet Mohammed during a quarrel with Muslim co-workers and her conviction should stand. If Pakistan’s harsh anti-blasphemy laws decree it, she should hang, they said.

“I would die in the name of my religion and if someone has committed blasphemy, then they are not forgiven,” said Shawkat Ali, a 62-year-old farmer. “If the supreme court has some faith in religion and if they are Muslims, they should execute her.”….

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