Journalism Prizes go to authors of stories on “refugees” and white supremacists, little girl victimized by “refugees” is ignored

No, not the true story of what happened to Jayla. “Abe Streep came to Montana in 2017 and 2018 to write long-form pieces on a Syrian refugee family in Missoula for Harper’s magazine…” Also winning was Rachel Kaadzi Ghansah, “who last year won a Pulitzer Prize for her feature profile for GQ magazine on white supremacist and mass murderer Dylann Roof.”

Of course. They won because these stories fit the media narrative. But Jayla’s story doesn’t. In the summer of 2016, a 5-year-old girl was sexually assaulted and urinated upon by three Muslim migrant boys in Twin Falls, Idaho. Since then, instead of getting justice, the victim’s family has been abused by law enforcement and governing authorities as if they were the criminals – because what happened to their little girl contradicts the politically correct narrative about Muslim migrants. See my article on this travesty of justice here.

“Reporter on Missoula refugee family, Arlee Warrior movement nets $100,000 prize,” by Kim Briggeman, Missoulian, February 5, 2019:

A freelance reporter who covered two looming issues in western Montana has netted one of journalism’s newest and biggest prizes.

Abe Streep came to Montana in 2017 and 2018 to write long-form pieces on a Syrian refugee family in Missoula for Harper’s magazine and the Arlee Warriors for the New York Times, and maintains ties with both circles.

He’s one of two freelance journalists to receive unrestricted cash prizes of $100,000 from the Heising-Simons Foundation, which announces its 2019 American Mosaic Journalism Prize winners on Tuesday.

The other is Rachel Kaadzi Ghansah, who last year won a Pulitzer Prize for her feature profile for GQ magazine on white supremacist and mass murderer Dylann Roof. That piece and a profile on Los Angeles artist Henry Taylor were the basis for her American Mosaic prize.

“The whole thing is surreal, totally surreal,” Streep, 37, said Monday from his home in Santa Fe. “It’s an overwhelming feeling because it came out of nowhere. The other thing is, the other winner (Ghansah), like, writes circles around everybody. She’s just incredible, and I don’t feel I belong in the same ballpark with her at all.”…

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