Turkey deports thousands of Syrian refugees after Turkey-backed rebels join al-Qaeda to fight Assad

Turkey has deported 4,500 Syrians this month alone” and “it is unclear how many of the thousands of Syrians removed this month left by their own accord or were forced to leave. Turkey denies that it is forcibly deporting any Syrians.”One cannot believe the Turkish government, and although its  has said that “no one under temporary protection can be deported,” Turkey has still done it.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan is full of deceptions; hisprecedes him. The nature of the Turkish deportations of Syrians showcases the intent:The deportations come less than a month after Turkey-backed rebels joined forces with al-Qaeda-linked jihadis to fight dictator Bashar al-Assad troops in an around Idlib.In a friendship gone sour beyond repair, Erdogan has dubbed Syrian leader  a “terrorist involved in state terrorism.” As much as Turkey sends mixed messages to the world, Human Rights Watch has backed up the indictments against Turkey. It has “accused Turkey of detaining and coercing Syrians into signing ‘voluntary return’ forms and then forcibly returning them to northern Syria, an area that is currently a war zone.”Turkey has also long 

“IS jihadis were bused to Syria on buses owned by the Turkish Intelligence Agency, MIT….At least 15,000 ISIS fighters entered Syria this way” while “Turkish authorities knew but did nothing to stop it.”

Erdogan’s continued manipulation of domestic and foreign affairs to expand his domestic, regional and global powers is clear; he still seeks to gain   in the European Union with the intent of further Islamizing Europe. But the EU parliament, in a rare sensible move, called for  on Turkey’s membership talks back in March. Membership talks should be ended altogether; the EU should toughen up and let Turkey and the Islamic world deal with its own problems and its own flood of refugees, giving aid from afar if necessary. Persecuted Christians need prioritizing.“Report: Turkey Forcibly Deported Thousands of Syrians in July,” by Edwin Mora

Turkey has deported 4,500 Syrians this month alone, suggesting authorities are intensifying efforts to deal with the “rumbling grievances” by locals “over their prolonged presence,” Reuters reported this week.

It is unclear how many of the thousands of Syrians removed this month left by their own accord or were forced to leave. Turkey denies that it is forcibly deporting any Syrians.

Hurriyet Daily News quoted Interior Minister Suleyman Soylu as telling broadcaster NTV on Wednesday:

“There are Syrians who come [to Turkey] via illegal means. We’ve taken them in and sent them to camps, saying that we have not given [you] a residence permit. No one under temporary protection can be deported. … What are doing with them? When we catch unregistered Syrians, we send them to camps. There are currently 100,000 people in the camps.”

All Syrians in Turkey are reportedly under temporary protected status.

“Our problem is with refugees who live in Istanbul but are registered in other provinces. Since July 12, we have caught 6,122 people, 1,000 of whom are Syrians. Of them, 2,600 are Afghans. We catch all of them. And except for the Syrians, we transfer them to repatriation centers. Syrians are under temporary protection,” the minister said.

The deportations come less than a month after Turkey-backed rebels joined forces with al-Qaeda-linked jihadis to fight dictator Bashar al-Assad troops in an around Idlib.

Ankara is participating in operations in northwestern Idlib province that are inciting more violence, driving residents towards Turkey.

Referring to the 4,500 removals of Syrian refugees from Turkey this month, Reuters noted on Thursday:

The numbers represent only a tiny fraction of the 3.6 million Syrian refugees in Turkey, but the detentions and transfers suggest authorities are stepping up actions to address rumbling grievances over their prolonged presence.

They follow two clashes in Istanbul when crowds attacked Syrian shops, now targets of resentment for Turks who see Syrians as taking jobs and crowding out health and education services while Turkey battles an economic recession.

Most Syrians live in southern Turkish provinces near the border but Istanbul province holds the largest contingent. Many have started hiding at home, waiting for the wave of arrests to recede and some stopping work to express their anger.

While some Turks are expressing anger about the ongoing presence of Syrian refugees in their country, Ankara is fomenting unrest in Syria.

Thousands of al-Qaeda-affiliated terrorists, and to a lesser extent Turkey-backed rebels, control the territory in and around Idlib, the last rebel stronghold in Syria.

This month, Reuters revealed that about 300,000 people fleeing the Russian-backed Assad regime’s renewed bombardment against Turkey-backed rebels and al-Qaeda jihadis in Idlib that began in April are heading towards the Turkish border…..

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