CAIR gets Christian program banned from Virginia jail

A Virginia jail has ended a Christian program which inmates dubbed the ‘God Pod’ after a lawsuit alleged the program provided favorable treatment to Christians and discriminated against Muslims.”

The argument was that “those in the ‘God Pod’ received preferred status such as their own cell and use of a television and microwave.” But there was no discrimination against Muslims, contrary to the charges of Muslim inmates, who were represented by the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR). Although prison officials indicated that “the program was built on biblical principles,” it was welcoming of people of all faiths.

In Sharia states, Christianity is considered to be an inferior, infidel religion; persecution of Christians is rampant. Now, even the Christian heritage of Western countries are being eroded by Islamic supremacists. Earlier this month, the Alaska Department of Law and CAIR settled a lawsuit in which Alaska paid $102,500 to two Muslim inmates because of how they were fed during Ramadan. CAIR also provided religious sensitivity training to Department of Corrections employees.

Meanwhile, in the UK,jihadists have been ruling prisons. “Vulnerable” infidel prisoners are paying the jizya, and Muslim prison gangs have been beating prisoners who won’t convert to Islam.

It won’t be long before the disastrous conditions in UK prisons are mirrored in American jails, thanks to Muslim advocacy groups such as CAIR.

“Virginia jail ends ‘God Pod’ program after Muslim inmates sue,” by Matthew Barakat, Associated Press,

ALEXANDRIA, Va. (AP) — A Virginia jail has ended a program which inmates dubbed the “God Pod” after a lawsuit alleged the program provided favorable treatment to Christians and discriminated against Muslims.

Court documents show the Riverside Regional Jail south of Richmond ended the program on the advice of counsel after a lawsuit was filed last year by Muslim inmates represented by the Council on American-Islamic Relations.

A judge in federal court in Alexandria heard arguments Friday on whether the Life Learning Program implemented by a jail chaplain violated constitutional prohibitions against establishment of religion.

Inmates said those in the “God Pod” received preferred status such as their own cell and use of a television and microwave.

Jail officials acknowledged the program was built on biblical principles but said it was open to all faiths.

Deborah Kane, a lawyer for the chaplain who was in charge of the program, said that the Bible is a religious text accorded respect in Judaism and Islam, so it’s wrong to assume a Bible-based curriculum favors Christians…..

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