Indonesia: Muslim protests turn violent, police question Christian governor over blasphemy claims

Indonesia: Muslim protests turn violent, police question Christian governor over blasphemy claims

“On Friday tens of thousands of Islamist protesters took to the streets of Jakarta and demanded Ahok be arrested after it was alleged he made comments about the Koran. What was a largely peaceful protest quickly turned violent as hard-line Muslims began attacking police and media crews and setting cars on fire. One person died and more than one hundred were injured. The violent events forcing President Joko Widodo to postpone his visit to Australia.”

And now Ahok has been questioned over claims that he insulted the Qur’an. This illustrates yet again: violent intimidation works. That is a lesson that Western authorities have been all too anxious to reinforce.

An update on this story. “Jakarta Governor Purnama questioned by police over allegations he insulted the Koran,” by Samantha Hawley, ABC.net.au, November 7, 2016:blasphemy Indonesia

The Governor of Jakarta has fronted the press after spending almost nine hours with police over blasphemy allegations linked to last week’s violent protest in the Indonesian capital.

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Basuki Tjahaja Purnama, known as Ahok, faced more than a dozen questions after being summoned by police over allegations he insulted the Koran.

He emerged to tell the waiting media if they want any more information they should get it from the investigator.

“I want to go home. I’m hungry,” he said.

Ahok supporters say the allegations against him are politically motivated ahead of a local election next year.

On Friday tens of thousands of Islamist protesters took to the streets of Jakarta and demanded Ahok be arrested after it was alleged he made comments about the Koran.

What was a largely peaceful protest quickly turned violent as hard-line Muslims began attacking police and media crews and setting cars on fire.

One person died and more than one hundred were injured.

The violent events forcing President Joko Widodo to postpone his visit to Australia.

Blasphemy allegations came after Ahok said his opponents had deceived voters by attacking him using a verse from the Koran.

The verse implies Muslims should not choose non-Muslims as leaders.

Ahok apologised for his remarks, insisting he was not criticising the Koranic verse but those who used it to attack him.

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